No surprises as Equant signs in Slough

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Ancient eye-popping martial art gains popularity in modern Vietnam

first_imgIn a sunny temple courtyard in Vietnam, Le Van Thang pushes an iron rod hard against his eye socket and tries to make it bend — his dizzying strength honed through years of practicing centuries-old martial art Thien Mon Dao.Thang, 28, is one of an increasing number of Vietnamese to find refuge in a sport that grew out of a need to protect the country from invaders, but now offers a route to mental wellbeing in the rapidly changing Communist nation.Practitioners of Thien Mon Dao have long taken pride in the incredible shows of strength that form part of their routines. The eye-popping feats include bending metal against their bodies, carrying heavy objects using their throats and lying under the path of motorbikes.Now many say they also take pleasure from how the sport — which includes elements of self-defense, kung fu and weapons training — has steered them on a new course.Thang, a furniture seller who first began practicing eight years ago, said he used to get into fights in high school and was also a gambler. “Once I stole money from my family but after that, I was brought to Thien Mon Dao by my family and I changed,” he told AFP. “There are so many benefits: I learned how to express my ideas, how to walk properly and behave.”Thien Mon Dao was first developed in the 10th century, according to master Nguyen Khac Phan, whose school trains in the complex of an ornate temple on the outskirts of Hanoi.In recent years it’s seen a surge in popularity, he says, with up to three new clubs set up in the capital each year. Vietnam currently has around 30,000 Thien Mon Dao practitioners across the country, with occasional public performances helping boost the sport’s appeal.”People come for different purposes but mostly they want to improve their health and mental health,” added Phan, who has been teaching the sport since the early 1990s.”Learning martial arts can help people see life in a better way, improve their strength… give up their mistakes to aim for better things,” he said.From tiny children who have barely started school to people in their eighties, Thien Mon Dao embraces anyone who wants to kick their way up through 18 different levels and seven belts.Sixteen-year-old Vu Thi Ngoc Diep, one of around 10 women training at the temple compound, said the sport had also given her a way to fight gender stereotypes.”Southeast Asian people think that girls should be gentle and not suitable for learning martial arts,” she said. “But I see it differently.”center_img Topics :last_img read more

Arsenal could sack Unai Emery because of Jose Mourinho’s return, claims Tony Adams

first_imgUnai Emery’s Arsenal required an injury time goal to force a 2-2 draw against Southampton (Picture: Getty)Tottenham’s decision to replace Mauricio Pochettino with Jose Mourinho could force the Arsenal board to sack Unai Emery, according to Tony Adams.The Spaniard was effectively given a vote of confidence during the international break after Arsenal lost 2-0 at Leicester earlier this month, and his team delivered another disjointed performance against struggling Southampton on Saturday.Alexandre Lacazette rescued a 2-2 draw in injury time against a side struggling at the bottom of the table, while Emery was subjected to a torrent of abuse and cries of ‘your’re getting sacked in the morning’ from his own fans.Meanwhile, across London, Spurs recorded their first away win in the league since last December in what was Mourinho’s first match in charge, and Adams believes Daniel Levy’s decision to act with such ruthlessness heaps the pressure on Arsenal’s board.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTHe said: ‘What’s happened over the other side of north London has put huge pressure on this guy, they’ve made a significant change.”They’re going backwards..”Tony Adams paints a bleak picture for Arsenal fans as the pressure grows on Unai Emery.#BTSportScore pic.twitter.com/eCiMsHbKQh— BT Sport Score (@btsportscore) November 23, 2019 Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 23 Nov 2019 5:06 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link2.3kShares Arsenal could sack Unai Emery because of Jose Mourinho’s return, claims Tony Adams Advertisement ‘This is a really poor performance. Absoutely, the fans are not going to be happy with this‘I don’t want anybody to go because I do think there’s been a huge problem with recruitment at the club for lots of years.‘But he’s not getting the best out of this group of players. They are literally all over the place and they’re going backwards.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalAsked whether Pochettino would be a suitable replacement for the beleagured Emery, Adams added: ‘I’m not sure he’s the right manager.‘I wouldn’t want him at this club I think the Tottenham connection and there might be other people out there.‘Someone who can do the defensive side of the game would be a start.’MORE: Former Arsenal captain Tony Adams stunned by awful David Luiz defendingMORE: Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang sends message to Arsenal fans over Granit Xhaka Comment Advertisementlast_img read more

Curved Gold Coast beach house with copper facade sells in multimillion-dollar deal

first_imgA local buyer has splashed $4.45 million on 4 Duringan St, Currumbin.An award-winning curved beach house, perched on a hillside with views of the ocean and national park, scored a sweet seven-figure deal.The impressive Currumbin beach house sold last week for $4.45 million.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:32Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:32 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenThis copper home is truly unique01:33RELATED: Curved beach house with copper facade unlike any other on the CoastThe seven-bedroom property boarders Currumbin National Park.It was designed by Paul Uhlmann Architects.The three-storey property was designed by Paul Uhlmann Architects and featured a copper clad facade shaped like a wave.Natural materials including timber, stone, iron and stainless steel were used throughout the contemporary residence which was created to blend into its surrounding environment of Currumbin Creek, the ocean and rainforest.MORE NEWS: Fairytale ending to competitive auctionMORE NEWS: What the interest rate cut means for youThe sellers are the founders of bottled water manufacturing company Nu-Pure.They sold their trophy home to move closer to their kid’s schools.Kollosche director Michael Kollosche sold the seven-bedroom trophy home alongside Eoghan Murphy.Mr Kollosche said a local buyer secured the keys and loved the home’s unique architecture, private location and views.The owners, Krystle and Mark Holmes, were calling for expressions of interest when they first listed the property before attaching a $4.975 million price tag.They decided to sell to move closer to their children’s school.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa9 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day agoMr Holmes is the founder and managing director of Nu-Pure, a bottled water manufacturing business which produces about 120 million bottles of spring water each year.The property was listed with a $4.975 million price tag.Its curved shaped resembles a wave.“My husband and I, we wanted to build something for our children,” Mrs Holmes told the Bulletin when the property hit the market in August.“I’m very hands on, so is my husband, so everything in our home is how we wanted it. Every detail my husband and I chose.“The property is built on a hill and the hill is quite steep.“We thought if we keep it simple, it won’t look over the top.”Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:27Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:27 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy Spring 2019 is a good time to sell01:27last_img read more

Eidesvik secures employment for two LNG-fueled PSVs

first_imgNorway’s Eidesvik Offshore has secured multiple contracts for its liquefied natural gas (LNG)-fueled platform supply vessels Viking Prince and Viking Queen.PSV Viking Prince is awarded an 85-day contract with Deceiper Production for operation on the UK continental shelf with a start-up date in February 2018, Eidesvik said.Following this contract, the Viking Prince will continue to a contract for Norwegian Shell to support their drilling of two exploration wells, one on Tyttebær close to the Knarr field and the other on Coeus close to Ormen Lange field, both on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.the two contracts mean the vessel will remain employed through the third quarter of 2018.The second LNG-fueled PSV, the Viking Queen has been awarded a contract with Saipem for the support of their pipe-laying vessel Castorone, which will be engaged in laying pipes from the Johan Sverdrup Field in the Norwegian Sector of the North Sea to Mongstad and Kårstø oil and gas terminals in Norway.The contract starting in March/April will have a term between 100 and 160 days, Eudesvik said.last_img read more

Conference to address opportunities in subsea cabling market

first_imgThe Subsea Cables Conference, hosted by Subsea UK, will take a look at opportunities which exist in the subsea cabling market.Subsea UK, the industry body representing British subsea industry, said on Monday that the Subsea Cables Conference would take place on Tuesday, September 18.Industry experts will come together to discuss and debate a range of topics including opportunities, project developments, reducing operating costs and technological challenges for the industry.Speakers on the day will include Justin Dix and Dave White of the University of Southampton; Ian Osborne of Wood and John Davies of Helix Canyon Offshore; Antony Zymelka from the European Subsea Cables Association; Mike Clare of the National Oceanography Centre; Saul Matthews of Synaptec and Phil Robinson of Bender UK.The inaugural Subsea Cables Conference took place last year in Aberdeen and saw more than 100 industry professionals share knowledge and experience as well as explore future market opportunities.Neil Gordon, chief executive of Subsea UK, said: “This event gives a unique opportunity for the key players in the subsea cabling industry to come together and discuss the challenges facing the sector and identify opportunities for growth in the coming years.”Subsea UK will also be hosting its annual networking dinner in London on the day of the conference, where Neil Gordon will deliver a keynote speech on the latest industry developments.The dinner, taking place at Skylon in the Southbank Centre, will also provide an opportunity to network with industry professionals from across the industry.last_img read more

Clay Hall, 90, Milan

first_imgClay Hall, 90, of Milan passed away on Thursday, November 30, 2017 at Waters of Dillsboro Ross Manor Skilled Nursing Facility.Clay was born on March 21, 1927 in Speedwell, Powell Valley, Tennessee, the son of Lloyd Hall and Marjorie Brewer Hall. He married Audrey Singleton Hall (deceased) on May 22, 1949.  He is survived by four children:  Michael W. Hall (Deborah) of Milan, IN; Gary L. Hall of Milan, IN; Carol Jackson of Milan, IN; Luwanda Hall-Lykens (Gary) of Greenfield, IN; 11 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren. Clay was preceded in death by: his wife, Audrey; sister, Blanche (Hall) Lawson; brothers, Thurman Lee Hall and Robert Hall; daughter-in-law, Judy (Elliott) Hall and son-in-law, Hubert Benjamin Jackson III.Clay was a hardworking, accomplished man.  At 15, he went to work for the Blue Diamond Coal Company in the coal mines. He enlisted in the Navy at age 16 and was deployed in World War II on the USS Mt. Baker (AE -4) munitions ship in the Pacific Theater.  At the age of 17, he and Don Willis (Indian Rocks Beach, FL) met when they were assigned the responsibility of the ship store and charged with running finances for the ship. Clay worked to receive his GED while serving during the war.Clay and his buddy, Don were the last two survivors of a crew of 300+ sailors who served with them on the Mt. Baker. They kept in touch and were still friends after 71 years.After WWII Clay was rehired by the Blue Diamond Coal Company and trained as a surveying engineer. In 1950 he moved his family to Milan, Indiana to farm full time while working in various factories. In 1965 he began working at Cummins Engine Company as a machinist on the factory line.  He rose through the ranks to become a manufacturing engineer for Cummins until he retired in 1985. Clay continued to farm until the age of 82.Clay was an active member of the Ripley County and Milan communities. He played an active role in the establishing the Southeastern Indiana Vocational School in Versailles and served several terms on the Milan Community school board. He was active in county politics and serve on the Ripley county election board. Clay was a thirty-second degree Mason and a 50 year member of Masonic Lodge 31 in Milan. He was also an active member of VFW Post 6234 and the American Legion in Milan.A memorial service will be held Saturday, December 9, at Hope Baptist Church in Dillsboro, IN at 1:00 PM. A time for visiting and reminiscing with family and friends will be held from 12:00 to 1:00 PM before the memorial service.In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations be made to the Milan VFW Scholarship Fund for high school seniors, a favorite of Clay’s projects at the VFW.  Checks can be made out to: Milan VFW Scholarship Fund, PO Box 117, Milan, IN  47031last_img read more

Allardyce has sympathy for Pearson

first_img “Club security should look at that situation around where the dugout is and if somebody is being particularly, constantly verbally aggressive, then the security should take the fan away and say it is not acceptable behaviour.” While it remains to be seen what the outcome of Pearson’s disciplinary case will be, Allardyce feels his former assistant coach during their time at Newcastle will emerge stronger from the saga. Allardyce explained: “It is one isolated incident, I can’t remember Nigel Pearson ever doing anything like that before. I worked with him at Newcastle for seven months and he is a guy who has got great morals and great standards. “He takes those standards into the way he is managed since he left Newcastle, that is why the football clubs he has been at have been successful. The Foxes are three points adrift at the foot of the Barclays Premier League after four successive defeats but Allardyce said: “Nigel has had a little blip and there is always a big fuss made about it – but it hasn’t happened before and he probably regrets it, but you have got to move on.” Press Association Allardyce, speaking ahead of Saturday’s clash between the teams at Upton Park, said: “I think it is wrong, personally. I think he should get a warning about his future conduct, because he hasn’t stepped out of line, but the FA are just as scared as everyone else about being politically correct. “It depends on what position you are in at that moment in particular time and if somebody has baited you as much as that fella did (with Pearson) then if you get a reaction, you get a reaction. “We are all human beings aren’t we? When you lose your rag, what do you do? Do you stay calm? No, so we cannot be angels all the time in this badly politically correct world we have. “This politically correct world drives you up the wall – we will be shutting the door too hard soon, it will make too big a noise for somebody and that will upset.” Allardyce believes clubs must be proactive in stamping out any abuse directed towards the technical area from the seating immediately behind. “It is up the clubs and the security system at the football club,” he said. “I think Leicester’s security let Nigel down because this lad was baiting him all the time, so they should have gone over, nipped him by the collar and pushed him out and said ‘don’t bother coming back here.’ It is what Manchester United have been doing for years to stop anything like that happening. “Fans are fans, up to a point, but if a manager turned around, pointed to a policeman and said ‘look, this guy is doing this, I want you to arrest him’, that will cause mayhem. West Ham manager Sam Allardyce believes the Football Association were wrong to charge Leicester boss Nigel Pearson over his argument with a fan, and feels more can be done to stop tempers boiling over behind the dugout. Pearson has accepted an FA charge of using insulting words towards a supporter but has requested a personal hearing. A video has emerged of the incident during his side’s 3-1 home defeat to Liverpool on December 2. The Foxes boss had refused to apologise for the altercation, which Allardyce, himself the target of boos from some West Ham supporters during a difficult spell last season, feels is now all too commonplace. last_img read more

Mayor: Broward Restaurants to Remain Open with Tighter Rules

first_imgBroward County has a revised plan to combat the growing number of coronavirus cases.On Wednesday, officials announced that instead of again closing restaurants to cope with the spread of the disease, they will merely tighten restrictions.To that end, restaurants will be required to limit tables to six people for indoor dining, and must close by 10 p.m., under an order from County Administrator Bertha Henry.Mayor Dale Holness said the new policy will take effect this Friday.In addition, restaurants that violate the order will be closed for 24 hours. Each additional violation will require the business to close for another 72 hours.Fines could end up being as high as $15,000.Vacation rentals also will have stricter rules, since they are being used to host parties.The order will require that only the people who signed up for the rental be allowed there.#SafetyFirst @AskBMSD pic.twitter.com/o5hWdTnHgZ— Municipal Svcs Dist (@AskBMSD) July 8, 2020 “If we don’t take all take responsibility to reduce the spread of this virus, what will happen is that the economy will continue to get worse because people are not going to be comfortable going out to dine,” Holness said.If the restrictions do not ultimately stop the rise in numbers, Holness said county officials could tighten enforcement, increase fines and close other businesses.He added that the order will remain in place until there is a drop in cases.Holness said earlier this week that more than 50 percent of complaints the county receives on its 311 hotline are regarding restaurants not following rules.Palm Beach County has not announced any similar closures at this time, although Mayor Dave Kerner said he could not say what may happen in the coming days.Broward’s beaches opened last Monday after being closed for the Fourth of July weekend.Florida recorded nearly 9,989 new cases of the coronavirus and 48 more deaths on Wednesday.Locally, Broward has 23,781 confirmed cases and 419 deaths. Palm Beach County has 18,231 confirmed cases and 569 deaths.last_img read more