UL seeks writer in residence

first_imgAnn & Steve Talk Stuff | Episode 44 | Immersive Software Engineering University of Limerick ceases funding for off-campus Garda COVID-patrols after sanctioning students following massive street party Previous articleNew electronic referral system to speed up medical appointmentsNext articleSavoy expansion gets provisional go-ahead Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie University of Limerick research identifies secrets of Fantasy Premier League success Facebook LifestyleNewsUL seeks writer in residenceBy Staff Reporter – October 17, 2017 2026 Print Linkedin Advertisement Gardai make arrests following chaotic student party near University of Limerick center_img WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick nurse helping the fight against COVID-19, calls for round the clock garda patrols near University of Limerick following “out of control” student parties TAGSUniversity of Limerickwirter in residence Decision on FIBA European Championships in Limerick to be made in May A WRITER in residence is being sought by the University of Limerick for its creative writing programme and applications are now invited from Irish writers of established reputation across all genres.Fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, drama and film writers are now being sought by UL for the post that is jointly funded by the Arts Council and University of Limerick.The Writer in Residence will be a part of UL’s Creative Writing community and will engage with students, staff and faculty in a number of ways.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Writer in Residence will also have the opportunity to develop her/his own work in a supportive environment and the stipend for the residency is €20,000.The residency runs from January through to December next year and the Creative Writing programme at UL is led by Professor Joseph O’Connor and is taught by a number of acclaimed writers, including novelists Professor Sarah Moore Fitzgerald, Professor Giles Foden and Donal Ryan.Candidates are invited to submit a covering letter outlining areas of interest, teaching experience (if any), ideas for engagement with UL’s Creative Writing programme, and a full CV to Niamh O’Sullivan: [email protected] Email Twitterlast_img read more

Fry turkeys with caution

first_imgBy Brooke HatfieldUniversity of GeorgiaIn recent years, fried turkey has been gaining on traditional roasted turkey as the holiday dish of choice. But as fried turkey’s popularity rises, so do concerns about the safety of deep-fat turkey fryers. Safety concerns include the stability of the fryers, uninsulated pot handles and lids and the potential for oil spillovers and overheating. Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., the leading organization in the United States for testing consumer products for safety and conformity to standards, issued an alert in June calling the fryers “extremely dangerous.” Frying turkeys is risky business Although many assume the dangers of fried foods lie in their fat content, Andress said there is no reason to think fried turkey is any less healthy than a regular roasted turkey. A common cause of turkey-fryer accidents is filling the pot too full of oil, causing the oil to spill over when the turkey is placed in the pot. At cooking temperatures, oil spillovers can result in severe burns. * Make sure you use the fryers on a flat surface to reduce accidental tipping. * Never leave the fryer unattended. Most units don’t have thermostat controls. If you don’t watch the fryer carefully, the oil will continue to heat until it catches fire. * The National Turkey Federation recommends thawing the turkey in the refrigerator, allowing about 24 hours for every 5 pounds of turkey. Follow safety guidelines If you must use a turkey fryer, the UL has issued these guidelines: The temperature of a whole turkey must reach 180 degrees Fahrenheit in the innermost part of the thigh, she said. The center of the stuffing must reach 165 degrees. If the stuffing hasn’t reached 165, keep cooking the turkey until it does. Consumer hotline numbers include: Because of these concerns, UL has elected to not certify any turkey fryers. The Consumer Product Safety Commission is also investigating the fryers. The only way to tell if all the bacteria have been killed is to measure the temperature of the cooked turkey with a food thermometer in several places.center_img “The major risks with frying are safety issues and making sure all the harmful bacteria are killed,” Andress said. * Always use turkey fryers outdoors a safe distance from buildings and anything else that can burn. * Never let children or pets near the fryer while it’s in use. Even after use, never let children or pets near the turkey fryer. The oil inside the cooking pot can remain dangerously hot for hours. * Never use turkey fryers on wooden decks or in garages. * Use well-insulated pot holders or oven mitts when touching pot or lid handles. If possible, wear safety goggles to protect your eyes from oil splatter. * USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline, 1-800-535-4555 or 1-800-256-7072/TTY, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. EST year-round. An extended menu of recorded food safety messages can be heard 24 hours a day. “The people who (fry turkeys) say it produces a moister turkey, and it’s quicker,” said Elizabeth Andress, a University of Georgia Extension Service food safety specialist. * To avoid spillovers, don’t overfill the fryer. * Keep an all-purpose fire extinguisher nearby. Never use water to extinguish a grease fire. Remember, use your best judgment when attempting to fight a fire. If the fire is manageable, use an all-purpose fire extinguisher. If it grows, call 911 immediately for help. * Make sure the turkey is completely thawed, and be careful with marinades. Oil and water don’t mix, and water causes oil to spill over, which could cause a fire or explosion hazard. * Butterball Turkey Talk Line, 1-800-BUTTERBALL (1-800-288-8372), 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. EST. Full daily calendar of hours is available at www.butterball.com.last_img read more