Infrastructure That We Can Trust

first_imgIt is the best of times and it is the worst of times for IT. The wealth of technologies, like cloud and big data, has been a boon for IT professionals, but the EMC Global IT Trust Curve Survey found that 61% of organizations suffered unplanned downtime, a security breach, or a loss of data at least once in 2013. Complexity has increased exposure to failures and threats, creating a lack of trust in the technologies. A different kind of solution is needed in response to this environment – a solution built on a strong foundation of trusted infrastructure.Defining Trusted InfrastructureI am part of a group at EMC assigned with defining and developing our point-of-view on trusted infrastructure. We started by checking out what the industry was already saying. The most credible definition we came across is from the Trusted Computing Group (TCG), a well-respected nonprofit organization that defines security specifications.This definition emphasizes broad predictable behavior as the root of trust, rather than narrowly focusing on the security elements of infrastructure. Using it as a basic construct, we developed our own detailed taxonomy, comprised of Trust Dimensions – six broad categories, each containing properties like identity and data availability. Many of these properties are adapted from the work of the Cloud Security Alliance.This representation provides a complete visual definition of trust. The novelty of this taxonomy is that it provides a comprehensive framework that can be used to build and assess trusted infrastructure. Consumers can use the standardized framework to map trust requirements for their own systems, and deploy solutions that deliver on what they need.  They can also query trust metrics to get an assessment of the overall ‘trustworthiness’ of their infrastructure.Envisioning a Trusted InfrastructureHaving defined the taxonomy, we started tackling implementation. The IT Industry has always had spot solutions on different dimensions of trust, so how is Trusted Infrastructure going to be different from any other infrastructure? Trusted Infrastructure has trust elements built in rather than added on as an afterthought and it is broadly usable rather than available only on a locked platform.Trusted Infrastructure will have three things in common:It needs a taxonomy which goes clearly beyond security and covers all relevant aspects of a predictable system.The services delivered to end users need to be highly integrated with the infrastructure.Trusted Infrastructure will need an open abstraction layer, Trust APIs, for use in higher level stacks like Hypervisor or Cloud OS.We now have a working taxonomy and vision, but there is still much work to be done. Our Trusted Infrastructure team is now identifying detailed use cases and socializing them with customers and industry thought leaders. Industry acceptance of the taxonomy is critical and your opinion is important. I am blogging on this topic regularly and would like to hear from you.last_img read more

Film festival promotes peace

first_imgThe eighth annual ScreenPeace Film Festival will show five critically acclaimed films in the Browning Cinema this weekend from Thursday to Saturday.The screenings are presented by the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center (DPAC). Ted Barron, senior associate director of DPAC, said the festival features a broad selection of films that reflect a range of global interests. He said this year’s films examine social issues and political events in Cambodia, Syria, Nigeria, Vietnam and the former Soviet Union.“The ScreenPeace Film Festival is designed to highlight films which draw attention to peace building efforts both in the United States and around the world,” Barron said.Hal Culbertson, executive director of the Kroc Institute, said the festival provides attendees a unique opportunity to see films otherwise unavailable in national theaters.“ScreenPeace is an attempt to bring a number of new documentary films to campus,” he said. “We try to bring films that we think both students and faculty will be interested in that also address peace and conflict issues from around the world.”This year’s ScreenPeace Festival features five documentaries that utilize a variety of filmmaking styles to convey themes of peace and nonviolence. Faculty members will lead discussions immediately following each film.“Our opening film, ‘The Missing Picture,’ mixes together file footage of the Cambodian genocide, of which there is very little, with clay figurines to capture the filmmakers’ memories,” Culbertson said. “It was up for an Academy Award last year and provides an interesting look at the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia.”Both Culbertson and Barron said they are also excited to show “The Man Who Saved the World,” a hybrid documentary that recounts the story of a Soviet official credited with helping avert a third world war.“’The Man Who Saved the World’ is a documentary, but it uses a lot of narrative reenactments of the original event to create an interesting effect,” Culbertson said. “We’re very pleased to be hosting the producers of the film, Mark Romeo and Christian Bruun, who will introduce their piece.”“The Missing Picture” will be shown Thursday night at 7 p.m. The festival continues Friday at 6:30 p.m. with “Return to Homs,” the story of a teenager’s fight to protect the captive inhabitants of the besieged city of Homs, Syria. Then, at 9:30 p.m. on Friday, ScreenPeace will show “The Supreme Price,” a political thriller detailing the story of the family of Nigeria’s 1993 president, M.K.O. Abiola.Saturday’s screenings begin with “The Man Who Saved the World” at 6:30 p.m. followed by “The Last Day in Vietnam,” a film chronicling the final days of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, at 9:30 p.m.The film festival augments students’ classroom experiences by providing additional perspectives on historical and modern events related to peace studies, Culbertson said. Oftentimes, professors with the Kroc Institute integrate the documentaries into their curriculums.“I think the main purpose [of the film festival] is to enhance classroom learning with films that bring realities from around the world to our students and faculty,” Culbertson said. “It’s an enhancement to learning from books. Films have the ability to transcend the classroom and provide a window to the rest of the world.”Although tickets to ScreenPeace are free, Culbertson said students should reserve seats ahead of time to ensure admittance. Last year, for the first time in the festival’s history, every seat for every film was reserved beforehand.“We have received overwhelmingly positive reactions to the festival,” Barron said. “Students are hungry to learn about ways that they can make a difference in the world. The films we present provide an avenue for them to better understand the world at large.”Tickets can be reserved over the phone, at the box office or online at performingarts.nd.edu.Tags: DPAC, Peace Studies, ScreenPeace Film Festivallast_img read more

State Road 252 crash injures Brookville woman

first_imgFranklin County, In. — A Thursday morning crash injured a Brookville woman on State Road 252 west of Little Cedar Road.A report from the Franklin County Sheriff’s Department says a car driven by Harlee Combs, 18, failed to negotiate a curve and drove off the road. The car went over an embankment and struck a tree.Combs was flown to University of Cincinnati Hospital with serious injuries.last_img