Meet Matthew Morgan, the next Wales fly-half

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS He’s small in stature but Webster says: “He’s powerful. I had no fears about putting him in the first team. He’s got to improve his kicking and game management but when a boy can run like that you don’t care.”Born in Reading, Morgan moved to Wales when he was eight. His brother Tom is a Swansea back-row and his family have helped to keep him grounded. Now the Ospreys and Swansea are working together to maximise his potential. Katie Field meets exciting young Ospreys fly-half Matthew Morgan.There’s a feeling in some rugby circles that young players have the natural flair coached out of them, but Swansea coach Richard Webster is determined not to let that happen to outside-half Matthew Morgan.“He just wants to run with a rugby ball and he doesn’t know anything else. He’s a breath of fresh air,” says the former Wales flanker.Morgan, 18, is in his first season with Swansea. Having learned his rugby at Bridgend Athletic, Brynteg Comp and Pencoed College, he made such an impression in his first month with the All Whites that he won the Principality Premiership Player of the Month award and was picked to play for the Ospreys in the LV= Cup victory over Leicester.Webster noticed the former Wales U18s player when he turned out for Bridgend in the last month of last season, helping to save them from relegation from Swalec League One East. The youngster nearly turned down that opportunity – “It was the weekend of my 18th birthday and I had been planning a weekend off,” laughs Morgan. TAGS: Ospreys Rugby World verdict:His innate flair and a good attitude make Morgan a great prospect.last_img read more

Tom Croft: Twitter Q&A

first_imgThis afternoon Croft took some time out to take part in a Q&A with the Rugby World on Twitter. Here’s what he had to say…[View the story “Tom Croft Q&A” on Storify] LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Galloping flanker: Tom Croft makes a dynamic return for Leicester Tigers against Worcester WarriorsBy Alan DymockWITH STUART Lancaster’s Elite Player Squad (EPS) being released this week, many will be happy to see the return of one of England’s most athletic and skilled back rowers, Tom Croft. The flanker is back after an eight-month layoff following neck surgery, playing for Leicester last weekend.last_img read more

Rugby World – November 2013 edition contents

first_imgEuro stars: Adam Jones, Geoff Parling, Simon Zebo and Tim Visser are on the covers of our Heineken Cup issueRUGBY WORLD’S latest issue is a Heineken Cup special, with every pool covered. There are big-name interviews with Geoff Parling, Adam Jones, Simon Zebo, Tim Visser and Saracens’ Vunipola brothers amongst others. We also take you down memory lane with fantastic pictures from Amlin Challenge Cup finals over the past decade while Stuart Barnes asks whether Clermont Auvergne will finally be crowned European champions.Fab four: Our November coversOn top of all that, England Rugby 2015 chief Debbie Jevans explains how plans are coming together for the World Cup and answers your questions, Stephen Jones analyses whether Australia are suffering a blip in form or are in a permanent slump, and we share some hilarious tales from this summer’s Lions tour. Plus, our grass-roots clubs section is back so you can keep up to date with all the rugby news in your area. This is the full list of contents – and you can find out where to buy your copy here or download our free magazine finder app here.SidelinesSteffon Armitage talks Toulon’s Heineken Cup defence, an Amlin Challenge Cup preview with Sale Sharks coach Bryan Redpath, a wacky conversation with Lions captain Sam Warburton, Simon Amor on his new England Sevens role, a women’s rugby rant, two up-and-coming prospects profiled in Hotshots and moreColumnistsStephen Moore – The Australia hooker looks ahead to their Grand Slam tourMark Evans – What’s the answer to the Euro crisis? Evans gives his viewSchalk Burger – It’s been a tough year for the Springbok flanker, as he explainsSpotlightsTim Visser – The Scotland wing vows that Edinburgh will come out firing in EuropeGareth Steenson – Exeter’s fly-half on the ups and downs of his road to the topNick Williams – The Ulster No 8 cannot wait for another Heineken Cup campaignRhys Patchell – Cardiff Blues’ No 10 is ready to kick on for club and country Club class: our grass-roots section returnsAdvice sectionPro Insight – Kicking tips from Dave AlredFitness – A workout to increase speedPro Playbook – A clever move of Brian Ashton’sMinis – How to work on your gripRegularsRugby focus – It’s back! We bring you all the news from the clubs and schools circuitEssentials – The latest books and products LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Simon Zebo – Munster’s speedster talks rap, racism and running rugbyVunipola Brothers – Saracens have bolstered their pack with Billy joining MakoClermont Auvergne – Chokers or champions? Stuart Barnes looks at their prospectsAmlin Challenge Cup – Iconic images from European finals over the past decadeWorld Cup 2015 – Debbie Jevans pops into the RW offices to talk all things 2015Lions tales – Dice, drinks and daring phone calls on the 2013 Lions tourStephen Jones –Our columnist assesses the Wallabies’ current poor formcenter_img Joining forces: Saracens’ Mako and Billy VunipolaFeaturesGeoff Parling – Meet the two sides of the Leicester lock: the joker in the pack and the fierce competitorAdam Jones – The Ospreys prop has plenty to talk about: scrum laws, moving to France and living with painChris Fusaro – The Glasgow flanker is being tipped as a future Test captain Uncovered – England lock Courtney LawesTour Tale – An embarrassing faux pas…last_img read more

Premiership analysis: Four moments of Wasps magic

first_img TAGS: Wasps Electric eel: Christian Wade strikes in the corner As a glorious Sunday afternoon for Wasps extended into evening, news broke that the club would be launching a retail bond listed on the London Stock Exchange. According to chief executive David Armstrong, the decision could see as much as £35 million raised by next season.Should such a projection come to fruition, the Ricoh Arena side would usurp Toulouse to become the richest club in the world. For an outfit that was facing liquidation in 2009, it is a remarkable reversal in financial fortunes.Genial director of rugby Dai Young had his tongue firmly in cheek in October when he noted how his weekly shop was now a Marks & Spencer affair rather than a whip round Lidl. However, the Welshman will soon be among the biggest spenders.Complementing this imminent prosperity, James Haskell’s charges have condemned the desperate relegation battle of three years ago to a distant memory. Two regular rounds remain in the regular Premiership campaign and they can still make the play-offs. A win over Leicester Tigers in Coventry on May 9 puts them fourth.As the division’s top try-scorers, Wasps are rarely far from producing a moment of pure brilliance. Rather appropriately, their squad is full of what Stuart Lancaster calls ‘something from nothing’ players – essentially mightily exciting performers who can conjure an instant of match-turning excellence.Though honest graft up front was integral too, this weekend’s crucial 36-29 victory over Exeter Chiefs featured four such moments. Let’s have a look.A fabulous flick from Nathan HughesBack from a rather ludicrous suspension, Nathan Hughes needed precisely one minute and a single scrum to assert himself. Standing six feet five tall and weighing almost 20 stone, the Fiji-born 23 year-old qualifies to represent England early next year but could easily cope with the Test arena right now.The reverse angle tells us that this set-piece begins in a rather innocuous position:However, Hughes takes on a 20-metre blindside. Notice how an arcing run aims to tie in wing Matt Jess.Flouting any coaching manual in a style akin to a carefree sevens player from the Pacific Islands, he holds the ball in one hand. His huge reach keeps it a long way away from the contact area:Wary of Hughes’ awesome power and deceptive pace, three Chiefs are committed to tackle the No 8:Now comes the tricky part. Still holding the ball in that mighty right mitt, Hughes aims a cute cat-flap from the floor to Christian Wade, who has kept his width well:An expert in tight spaces – as we will come to later – the wing finishes brilliantly:Matt Mullan’s stealthy pilfer Perhaps not as spectacular as other plays in this article, this intervention was nonetheless outstanding, underlining Wasps’ muscularity up front.Matt Mullan enjoyed a fine scrummaging shift and offered plenty of energy in the loose as well. Here, he is part of the initial tackle on Dave Ewers from the restart:He manages to free himself from the contact area though, taking his place at guard on the far side of the ensuing breakdown as Chiefs scrum-half Will Chudley spots a gap:Mullan shimmies across to help Haskell down Sam Hill……before releasing the tackled player……and latching back onto the ball:Referee Matt Carley was quick to award a penalty and Andy Goode put the hosts 13-10 ahead. Then the fun really began.Wade rips the script apartTeams with dangerous strike runners can spark openings from fractured situations, often when it appears their opponents are on top.Here, Exeter cause confusion and force the ball loose from an effective counter-ruck. Joe Simpson must hit the breakdown, so Wade assumes the role of scrum-half: A 36-29 victory over Exeter Chiefs at the Ricoh Arena kept Wasps in the title race. It also showcased some thrilling moments from the Premiership’s most exciting side. center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Scooping up the ball, Wade sets off. He dances his side back onto the front foot. First, Dean Mumm is shrugged off:Two lightning left-foot steps bypass Mitchell Lees and Kai Horstmann:Tighthead Tomas Francis almost gets back, but Wade wriggles away from a fourth man:The sequence looks mesmeric in slow motion:Covering across, Hill finally gets hold to stop the carnage:But, as Jess – a sixth defender – dives in, Wade releases another neat out-the-back offload to Lorenzo Cittadini: The Italian tighthead does not panic, aiming a calm inside pass to Haskell. However, the pass does not come at this point, when Wade – back on his feet and tearing through on an incisive support line – would have skated in to complete a brace:Instead, the flanker held on just too long and his teammate overran. In any case, the passage was a prime example of the unique capabilities of electric evasion Wade could offer to England as a back three option.And Wasps had another World Cup hopeful on their soapbox with 77 minutes gone. The game needed winning. Up stepped a certain scrum-half.Simpson’s stunnerIt does seem strange that Simpson has only experienced 13 minutes of Test rugby, and that coming back in 2011 when Georgia had already been beaten.He is an awesome, if unconventional, talent who produces something jaw-dropping fairly regularly. This was exceptional, beginning with a sturdy gather of Chudley’s high ball:Spinning away over his left shoulder, Simpson then glances up to see a wall of white:Now, a blend of searing pace and vision serves him well. Swerving back on himself, Simpson arcs away from Exeter’s kick-chase and isolates Ewers. He glides to the right of the hefty back-rower and snakes into open space:Truly, we have a try of the season candidate on our hands:A 32,600 sell-out is expected for the visit of Leicester. it is extremely likely that one or two of those in attendance will be England coaches with their World Cup training squad in mind.When the time is right, the hosts will shake off the shackles and give it a go. It is the only way they know. Inspired by Messrs Hughes, Mullan, Wade and Simpson, Wasps are sprinting after silverware.Thanks to BT Sport and Premiership Rugby for the match footage. You can purchase tickets to the Aviva Premiership final at Twickenham here.last_img read more

Summer tours: Italy and Scotland tread new ground in Singapore

first_imgSatay on Saturday? Singapore has a reputation for fantastic food, whether fine dining or street stalls“This is a precursor of many more world-class matches to come. As we go into 2019, when Japan hosts the 2019 Rugby World Cup, there will certainly be more teams wanting to come and play here. We already have excellent sporting infrastructure in the form of the National Stadium in the Sports Hub, and once international teams and players start coming here to play, Singapore gets more recognition as a hub for rugby in Asia.”For tickets to the historic Italy v Scotland match, click here. Gregor Townsend’s new journey starts in the Lion City as Italy and Scotland do battle in a fixture set to pave the way for other Tier One nations in South-East Asia Advertising featureYou don’t need an excuse to visit Singapore but here’s a great one anyway – the historic Italy v Scotland Test match that takes place there on Saturday 10 June.The European nations will contest the first Tier One International to be played in the Lion City and their meeting represents a significant landmark for the South-East Asian country.Talks to stage a southern v northern hemisphere Test in Singapore later this year are already underway and there’s little doubt that Italy and Scotland will be the first of many top-flight international sides to do battle in the magnificent three-year-old National Stadium, with its world-beating retractable dome.Special venue: the National Stadium has already staged Super Rugby and World Series Sevens (SGH)Strong Scottish The match has special meaning for Scotland, marking as it does the start of Gregor Townsend’s reign as national coach. And 20 years after starring for the victorious Lions in South Africa, the coach will have almost a full set of players to choose from because only three Scots have made this year’s Lions party.Injuries mean Richie Gray and Sean Maitland will also be absent but the core of the squad that won three of their five Six Nations matches will be on duty, including Finn Russell, Jonny Gray and Hamish Watson – three men many felt deserved to be wearing Lions’ red in New Zealand.Tighthead WP Nel, who would surely have been a Lion barring a season-long neck injury, and No 8 Josh Strauss, recovered from a kidney injury, also feature in a squad led by John Barclay.Box seat: Ali Price is set to start at No 9 in the absence of Lions tourist Greig Laidlaw (SNS Group/SRU)“It’s exciting to be able to play in a unique stadium and the fact that it’ll be Scotland’s first International there will make for a great occasion,” says Townsend.“I’ve not been to Singapore before but I know a number of players are looking forward to not just the stadium but the island as a whole, having heard so many good things about it.“Playing Italy in Singapore will be a very different prospect from taking them on in Edinburgh or Rome, and it will be a challenge for both teams to adapt to the new surroundings.“Italy are a team we know well and we can expect it to be a very competitive match. It will provide us with the ideal opportunity to get our game into place on the way to playing Australia and Fiji as part of our summer tour.”Italian opportunityConor O’Shea’s Italy had a torrid Six Nations but they won Tests in USA and Canada last June and famously downed the Springboks in November. They have beaten Scotland eight times in 27 meetings, most recently at Murrayfield in 2015, and will not be fazed by facing the world’s fifth-best team, according to the current world rankings.Letting off steam: Italy fans haven’t had too much to cheer about in 2017 but remain optimistic (FIR)O’Shea recently likened the Azzurri to Glasgow Warriors, the team Townsend coached to the Guinness Pro12 title before taking the Scotland reins.“Twenty years ago, Glasgow were losing by 80 points, ten years ago one Scottish franchise went bust and Glasgow and Edinburgh were going nowhere,” he told ESPN. “But come 2017, both Glasgow and Edinburgh were into European quarter-finals and Scotland are looking better. It takes time.” Try threat: Scotland wing Tim Visser takes on Italy during this year’s Six Nations (SNS Group/SRU) center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS As last year, O’Shea has chosen to rest veteran players like Sergio Parisse for a tour that also includes Tests in Fiji and Australia in the following fortnight. New Zealand referee Paul Williams will take charge of both the Singapore match and the one in Suva on 17 June.Pipped in Tokyo: Italy last toured in Asia three years ago, when they succumbed 26-23 to Japan (FIR)“We can’t wait to take the field in Singapore, which is a new and thrilling challenge for Italy in the Test arena,” said O’Shea of what is a designated home fixture for the Azzurri. “There is a huge amount of work going on behind the scenes to prepare this group for the challenges ahead. We are also making changes within our system which we feel will benefit Italian rugby both in the short and long term, but no one is under any illusions about the task ahead.“The goal for this group of players on tour is to ensure we execute and start taking the opportunities that we have undoubtedly had. Once we do that, and play with the intensity and focus that we aspire to, we will become the team that we and our supporters desire.”Busy scheduleThe clash is part of a wonderful array of Test-match action in June. Ireland are also in Asia as they play a two-Test series against Japan, while there are RWC 2019 qualifiers in the Americas and Oceania. In fact, Pacific Island teams play six Tier One Tests. Fiji take on the Wallabies as well as Scotland and Italy, Samoa tackle Wales and New Zealand, and Tonga also get a crack at the Welsh.“There has been a massive step up in international competition since the last Rugby World Cup,” says World Rugby chairman Bill Beaumont, “and this Test window will allow for some very interesting matches.”Hot destinationSingapore will be at the heart of that and those fans flying in to see the Italy-Scotland match will be keen to make the most of a city that Lonely Planet described as one of the world’s hot-list destinations.Few visitors leave without seeing the award-winning, 101-hectare Gardens by the Bay that features space-age bio-domes, high-tech Supertrees and a Cloud Forest complete with a waterfall. A Skyway connects two of the Supertrees, giving breathtaking views of the gardens, city and South China City.Full bloom: fans coming for the rugby can take in stunning sights like Gardens by the Bay (TILT Pte)Indulgence of a different kind will be another priority as Singapore’s street food is the pride of the city. Head to the Amoy Food Centre to find local fare at stalls such as A Noodle Story, Famous Crispy Curry Puff and Hong Kee Beef Noodle and Hoo Kee Rice Dumpling.Nearby is the Maxwell Food Centre with its celebrated Tian Tian Hainanese chicken rice.You can find out more about the sights of Singapore here, but as Scotland and Italy prepare for their third encounter on neutral soil – Scotland won 18-16 in Saint Etienne (2007) and 30-29 in Pretoria (2013) – the last word goes to Low Teo Ping, chairman of Rugby Singapore.“We have been hosting Super Rugby matches and the HSBC Singapore Rugby Sevens, so we are well prepared to organise an event of this stature,” he says.last_img read more

Seven things we learnt about rugby in October 2020

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Perhaps the most pleasing aspect of the win was Ben Youngs’s performance. Two tries on his 100th cap was the ultimate way to silence the din on social media. His second try – beating four defenders with a dummy and 20-metre dash – will have been particularly pleasing.Related: Ben Youngs marks 100th England cap with two triesFrance are genuinely, really, finally backOver the past ten years, this column has stated that French Test rugby is back on an almost yearly basis. Only for it to perform a Boris Johnson-like U-turn. But, and it is official, French Test rugby really is back now. Never in the past decade has the France team performed at such a consistently creative level and it is fantastic for the game.If you’re under the age of 30, you may wonder what all of the fuss is about when it comes to French rugby. But in the 1980s and early 1990s they were creative rugby. The All Blacks have always been the performance benchmark, but the French were the artistic barometer.To see Romain Ntamack and Antoine Dupont play as they do creates genuine happiness. But this French team are about more than a once-in-a-generation half-back combo; they have the spine and depth to mount a legitimate World Cup challenge.The real gem is arguably Arthur Vincent in the centre. His ability to soak up any problems in midfield, with and without the ball, is the real glue in that back-line and something that all the best teams have access to.For France to have won the title would have taken something that even 2020 would have regarded as a weird outlier, but the manner in which they beat Ireland would have impressed French supporters. Very solid set-piece, control of the breakdown and an impressive 12 line breaks meant France were exerting pressure at all times, in all areas of the field.France are back and this time it’s real.The All Blacks bitThe All Blacks are better than your team. A lot better. Especially Richie Mo’unga. Nothing more to add.Pocock, the NFL rugby playerOctober saw David Pocock announce his retirement and cement his position as arguably the greatest ‘fetcher’ of the ball that the game has ever seen. There are breeds of dog that have been genetically cross-bred for thousands of years that can’t fetch stuff from the ground as well as Pocock.Sam Warburton, half-man, half-mollusc himself, said he was the strongest player that he’s ever encountered over the ball. And when you think of the players with whom Warburton’s career crossed that paints a very clear picture of Pocock’s ability. Some may see it as a slight to suggest that Pocock was primarily a ‘fetcher’; he did after all play six, seven and eight for the Wallabies – a feat that only the very best back-row forwards ever achieve. It’s just that Pocock’s ability over the ball was so profound that it was akin to an NFL player in its specialism and its brilliance.Pocock made a massive impact on the pitch and will continue to do the same off the pitch. He is simply one of the greatest role models that the sport has ever had, plus he contains less fat than a yoghurt.All eyes on a Wales second-rowScotland’s victory over Wales was very well deserved. Their pack dominated the ground, built and defended stacks of phases, and condemned Wales to their fifth loss in a row.Related: Scotland win in Wales for the first time since 2002However, it’s hard to ignore that the pre-match build-up, for many in Wales, was all about one Welsh second-row – Will Rowlands.Mainstream media obviously focused on Alun Wyn Jones’s stunning achievement in becoming the most-capped player in the history of the sport. But for the real Welsh rugby geeks, it was the other lock who got most attention.Big potential: Will Rowlands takes the ball into contact against Scotland (Getty Images)Rowlands is a rarity for Welsh rugby: he’s big. Not just ‘civilian walking down the street’ big, he’s rugby big. At 6ft 8in tall and pushing 20st, he has the type of size that countries with small playing populations just don’t produce. Every country can produce a stack of players who are 6ft 6in and 18st, but it’s only really England and South Africa who can consistently produce the Lord of the Rings players.Despite the loss, Rowland’s performance was promising, and he delivered a level of heavy carrying that Wales historically haven’t had access to. With one Welsh lock coming towards the end of one of the finest careers that the global game has ever seen, it is in Rowlands that many Welsh hopes lie.Caleb Clarke – the debut of debuts There have been plenty of outstanding Test debuts during October. Ireland’s Hugo Keenan and Will Connors both stood out against Italy, but even amongst these promising debuts Caleb Clarke’s stood out.We regularly see young players emerge at club level and instantly dominate. That is not the case at Test level, where looseheads are the speed of club-level flankers, flankers move like centres and wings cover the ground like something from a nature documentary.Yet Clarke made Test players look like kids. He is a legit triple-threat wing and even if you don’t fall for one of his feints, you’re ending up on YouTube, at best on the floor, at worst in tears.He beat 14 defenders in his debut, yup 14 – the last time we saw that many men badly beaten was in Goodfellas. The All Blacks have a reputation for military-grade wingers and Clarke sits amongst the best of them on debut.English Premiership worked out in the endWorking in professional sports administration over the past six months has been tricky to say the least. Donald Trump’s social media advisor has probably slept more soundly since March than those running rugby.The situation seemed particularly acute in the Gallagher Premiership, where every decision made was scrutinised to a level that was only possible because there were millions of rugby fans locked in their houses with nothing to do. But at the end of it all, the plan came together.That Exeter were able to win the title is all that really matters. They were the best team in England by some distance and added creativity in the backs to what was already a forward platform that could be called up alongside the Territorial Army should there be an invasion.That so few of their players are in the England squad remains a mystery, but thankfully the question over who is the best team in England has been answered. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Paul Williams is back with his monthly review of the game’s big happenings England‘s inspiring Six Nations triumphWhilst all the other teams in the Six Nations promised hope and progression, some achieving that, some not, it was England who delivered what mattered – the title.It could be argued that this England win is one of the greatest in the tournament’s history, as for the first time, there were six opposing teams for England in this year’s competition – that additional team being Covid-19.Of course, all the teams had to deal with the pandemic, but none of the others had their first match after the break cancelled. To go cold into a must-win away match seems to have been overlooked by many.Their win in Italy has been labelled by some as uninspiring, but nothing is more inspiring than winning. In the end, England’s win in Italy was composed. A bonus-point victory against an Italian team that had radically improved their breakdown in one week should not be underestimated – many have failed to do that in the past. Title triumph: England captain Owen Farrell lifts the Six Nations trophy (Getty Images) last_img read more

Kyle Sinckler replaces Andrew Porter in Lions squad

first_img Kyle Sinckler replaces Andrew Porter in Lions squadKyle Sinckler has been called up to the British & Irish Lions 2021 squad after Andrew Porter was ruled out of the tour to South Africa with a toe injury.Ireland prop Porter suffered the injury in Leinster’s 15-12 defeat by Glasgow on Friday night in the Guinness Pro14 Rainbow Cup – his province’s penultimate match of the season.Sinckler, who played in all three Test matches on the 2017 tour to New Zealand, has been named as Porter’s replacement.The England prop was a surprise omission from the original 37-man Lions squad but responded to the disappointment by putting in a Man of the Match performance for Bristol Bears after the announcement – and Warren Gatland has been impressed by his recent form.Related: Kyle Sinckler emotional interview on Lions omissionLions head coach Gatland said: “It’s really bad luck for Andrew and we send him our very best wishes for a quick and successful rehab. The Ireland prop has been ruled out of the South Africa tour with a toe injury LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight “Andrew is a young man with a big future ahead of him and I’m sure he’ll be in contention again in four years’ time.Leinster’s Andrew Porter has suffered a toe injury (Sportsfile/Getty Images)“As always in rugby, when there’s an injury there’s an opportunity for someone else. I have been very pleased to see the way Kyle has responded to initially being left out of the touring party.“He’s shown some excellent form of late and I hope he continues to stick two fingers up to me about leaving him out in the first place.”LIONS 2021 LATEST NEWSSinckler will join up with the Lions squad once Bristol’s domestic season concludes. The Bears ensured a home semi-final in the Gallagher Premiership by beating Leicester on Saturday and will be hoping to make the final on 26 June, the same day the Lions play Japan in Edinburgh. Kyle Sinckler on the attack for Bristol against Sale (Getty Images) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

New Zealand: Quake-crippled ChristChurch Cathedral to be demolished

first_img ChristChurch Cathedral – “a very dangerous building,” says Bishop Victoria Matthews. Photo: John Kirk-Anderson/Fairfax NZ[Taonga News] Quake-crippled ChristChurch Cathedral will be brought down to a “safe level” – between 2 and 3 meters high.Some walls may be lowered even further, for safety reasons, while none of the walls will be left intact. But the footprint will remain, and no bulldozers or wrecking balls will be used in the demolition.Diocese of Christchurch Bishop Victoria Matthews released this information on Mar. 2.Mayor Bob Parker called the decision “heartbreaking” for many people in Christchurch. “We all have a sense of ownership in this building,” he said. “This has not been an easy decision for the church. It is not an easy decision for many of us to accept either.”Earlier, Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority (CERA) Minister Gerry Brownlee applauded the decision, which was made last night at a special meeting of the Diocesan Standing Committee and Church Property Trustees.Matthews said taonga and heritage items – including the stained-glass windows – would be removed over the next few months.The process of bringing down the 130-year-old cathedral to a safe level is likely to take most of the year.“This is very different from the plan presented last October, due to the seismic events of 23 December,” she said in a prepared statement to the diocese.“CERA has insisted that we present a new plan to ensure the building is safe, and we agree with their requirement.“I am sad to have to relay this decision but I believe it is the way forward.“There are of course other voices and alternative opinions but I have relayed to you the decision of the Cathedral Project Group, which … has the delegated authority to make recommendations about the future of the cathedral to the Cathedral Chapter, CPT and Standing Committee.“The decision was made with much prayer and deliberation and has the support of each of the various groups.“It is also the decision that has the highest support from CERA for safety reasons.“The demolition and deconstruction will be carried out with care and great respect for a wonderful sacred space that has been damaged beyond repair.“My prayers and the prayers of many around the world are with you at this time.“It is now up to all of us to show that we are the living Cathedral of Christchurch; and that we carry within us and live out the Gospel of Jesus Christ wherever we go and wherever we are.“In the midst of this sad outcome let us not neglect to witness to the hope within us due to God’s love, grace and mercy.”At a separate CERA media conference this morning, Brownlee told reporters church leaders had made a good decision and he admired their courage.He said the real challenge now was to work out the shape of the next building or place that defines Christchurch.‘No bulldozers or wrecking balls’Speaking to a media conference in the Botanic Gardens this afternoon, Matthews said no bulldozers or wrecking balls would be used in the deconstruction.She acknowledged “the high level of community interest and sense of ownership as the cathedral was both an iconic building and a place of regular worship by many.“However, this is now a very dangerous building that needs to be made safe.“Our priority is also to ensure people working on-site are safe – in fact, if anyone had been in the building on December 23 they would have been put at a great risk of serious injury or worse.”Matthews said the diocese was facing a hard reality – “the cathedral is the revered ‘Mother Church’ but is not the only church in the diocese to have sustained damage, in some cases irreparable or too costly to repair.”She said cost had been a factor in the decision. “Currently, the Church Property Trust has estimated a NZ$20-$30 million (US$16.68-$25.02 million) shortfall over the whole Anglican diocese, which does not include the potential cost of any future damage.“In regard to the cathedral specifically, the sums are staggering. A replica cathedral has been ruled out due to an estimated NZ$100 million (US$83.41 million) shortfall, while a new build incorporating some of the old would incur a shortfall of up to NZ$50 million (US$41.7 million).“We would not be responsible stewards if we ignored the financial realities – in this respect, we are facing a similar challenge as the Roman Catholic diocese.“We are now looking to the future and creating a beautiful, inspiring, safe new cathedral but we understand it will take some time for any of these decisions to be made.“Meanwhile, we are committed to establishing a transitional cathedral in the central city to bring hope to Christchurch and provide a much-needed venue where the community can pray, reflect and gather for worship.” Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Zealand: Quake-crippled ChristChurch Cathedral to be demolished Anglican Communion Tags Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Andreas Osiander says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments (2) New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs John Williams says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Servicecenter_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA April 19, 2012 at 1:41 pm Surely, a unique historical building like this cannot be sacrificed because of the COST of saving it. Money can always be replaced. This building cannot be replaced.If money is needed, it will have to be found. I am not aware that efforts have been made to raise awareness of the situation and of the financial needs arising from the duty to preserve the cathedral for future generations? And how could there have been, since the decision overrules a previous decision only a few months old, due to a new earthquake even more recent than that?I cannot help but feel that for all the hand-wringing of bishop and mayor they are really taking the easy way out.The cathedral a “very dangerous building that needs to be made safe” (to quote bishop Matthews)? Such theatrical rhetoric does little to convince one of the sincerity of the reasons given for demolition. To make the cathedral “safe”, it could no doubt be secured by scaffolding or similar devices and closed to the public (as no doubt it already is) so there would be no risk of injury.I very much hope that an outcry will be raised against this suspiciously hasty decision. Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA March 2, 2012 at 5:11 pm I visited Christchurch about 10 years ago and was captivated by the charm of the city and the grace of its Cathedral. I have been following the developments as they were announced and feel a sense of loss that this building will soon be no more. My thoughts and prayers are with the Bishop and people of Christchurch. By Brian ThomasPosted Mar 2, 2012 Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Releaselast_img read more

Advocacy, witness and accompaniment for Sudan

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Richard Parkins is executive director of the American Friends of the Episcopal Church of Sudan. Photo/Matthew Davies[Episcopal News Service] With hardly a chance to bask in the jubilation that accompanied the July 2011 creation of the Republic of South Sudan, the advocacy community was called into action to protest the military actions of the National Congress Party (NCP) and the government of Sudanese president Omar al-Bashir in violating the terms of the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA).The CPA provided for the residents of Abyei to determine their future through a separate referendum, and the Blue Nile and the Nuba Mountains to have their status determined by a process described as “popular consultation.” Khartoum invaded Abyei and displaced thousands who have since had their hopes dashed, finding themselves in an even more precarious situation. Within months the NCP’s war machine rained bombs on South Kordofan and the Nuba Mountains followed by aggressive military action against the Blue Nile.Often a major impediment to convincing advocacy is a lack of access to documentary evidence, in this case the victims of a massive assault by the Khartoum regime. The efforts of the Episcopal Church and the American Friends of the Episcopal Church of Sudan (AFRECS) were aided immensely by the presence of several Sudanese bishops who at various times spoke powerfully to the plight of their people.The bishop of Abyei, Abraham Nhial, and the bishop of Kadugli/South Kordofan, Andudu Adam Elnail, presented at the AFRECS 2011 conference a graphic depiction of the fate that had befallen their people as a result of the reign of terror inflicted by the Bashir government. AFRECS’ ability to introduce these church leaders as authoritative witnesses to members of Congress and key administration officials such as the Special Envoy to Sudan and the Assistant Secretary for Africa allowed the voices of victims to be heard through the pleas of their leaders.A concern for many as Sudan became two nations was the plight of Christians in the north, where it was expected that a more severe form of Islam would take hold. These fears were fomented by strident voices in Khartoum speaking of a country that was committed to a single culture that would offer little accommodation to other religions, languages, or traditions.AFRECS and the Episcopal Church were informed in their advocacy by two visits to the United States by Bishop Ezekiel Kondo of the Episcopal diocese of Khartoum. This articulate and compelling spokesperson for a major swath of Sudan’s Christians was for U.S. policy makers and advocacy groups one of the few indigenous voices for Khartoum’s Christians with whom they were able to have a face-to-face encounter. The bishop’s description of discrimination against Christians and the harassment that churches were experiencing gave clear signals of the difficulties that were emerging as Sudan felt emboldened in moving forward with policies designed by its more radical Islamists.To be effective, advocacy must be timely so that any proposed intervention can occur in sufficient time to make a difference. In dealing with Sudan, deadlines are invariably unreasonable and hostile to South Sudanese, thus urgent action becomes a standard requirement if lives are to be saved. For example, advocates are pressing for an extension of an April 8 deadline – the time by which South Sudanese must meet Sudan’s difficult citizenship requirements if they are not to be disenfranchised. If the extension does not happen, more than 500,000 people could find themselves stateless. The consequences are particularly devastating since the 24,000 persons who have been registered by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees as prospective returnees may be impacted by the cutoff. At present, these persons are unable to leave Sudan either because they lack a means of departing or face a blockade on their movement south by the Sudanese government. To be disenfranchised in a place where the government resents your presence and to be without protection produces untold panic and fear.Many members of the AFRECS network and the Episcopal Public Policy Network help to sustain advocacy as issues and causes demand. The eight U.S. dioceses that have partnership and companion connections with dioceses of the Episcopal Church of Sudan help to carry forth to congressional offices and the administration the message that there is a faith community that cares deeply about the fate of their Sudanese sisters and brothers. It is this grassroots constituency that provides whatever leverage the Episcopal Church has as it presses public policy-makers to act. Now a weekly AFRECS e-blast makes certain that interested Episcopalians have current news about developments in Sudan, particularly those involving the church either as actor or victim.The Episcopal Church has for several years given primacy to peace in Sudan as a justice concern and has introduced resolutions which frame its advocacy agenda. A major resolution was introduced at the 2009 General Convention that set the stage for the advocacy done around the January 2011 referendum. With the escalating violence occurring in Abyei and the Nuba Mountains, another resolution that advocated for stronger U.S. leadership in enabling aid agencies access to the war-ravaged regions of the north was delivered by Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori to AFRECS at its 2011 conference. The resolution was reaffirmed by the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council at its February 2012 meeting. These resolutions arm advocates with the backing that allows them to speak authoritatively for a couple of million Episcopalians. The resolutions are shared with those on whose doors we knock as we press for action on behalf of suffering Sudanese.The work that the church does is most often done in collaboration with like-minded religious and non-sectarian human rights organizations. For example, interfaith work has been instrumental in allowing the larger faith community to speak forcefully to the government to urge more robust action in ending the embargo on assistance reaching Sudanese now at grave risk because of Khartoum’s intransigence in allowing relief to those whom it continues to attack. It is the solidarity among a broad spectrum of organizations and religious bodies, including leaders within the diaspora community, which gives significant energy to our advocacy. This was evidenced most recently with the array of voices that appeared this past Friday in front of the Sudanese Embassy in Washington, D.C., to protest the use of food as a weapon against the people of the Nuba Mountains.Reflecting on the several years of advocacy carried about by the Episcopal Church and AFRECS, credit can be claimed for success as the cumulative impact of this work combined with that of many stalwart colleagues helped create pressure for a peaceful referendum. It is hoped that these persistent voices will add pressure to preventing the starvation of thousands and bringing an end to a conflict that is writing another tragic page of suffering and displacement for thousands of Sudanese.Even when results are slow in coming or may seem to produce modest results, advocacy must be viewed as a means of extending ourselves as faithful Christians to those who need to know that they are not alone and not abandoned in their quest for justice and peace. Advocacy is a way of expressing solidarity and accompaniment with those who desperately need it.— Richard Parkins is executive director of the American Friends of the Episcopal Church of Sudan. Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Africa, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group By Richard ParkinsPosted Mar 22, 2012 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS center_img Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Sudan & South Sudan Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. 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Harlem church draws attention to critical community issues

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cramon Milline says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Posted May 25, 2016 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Volunteers gather outside Saint Philip’s Episcopal Church before the #KnowJusticeHarlem event on Monday, May 23. Photo: Angela James[St. Philip’s Episcopal Church] Residents of Harlem, along with several nonprofit and religious organizations, joined author Bryan Stevenson to discuss the impact of incarceration on the Harlem community. The May 23 event, titled #KnowJusticeHarlem, was hosted by Circles of Support, a network of faith and community partners providing services to previously incarcerated men and women returning to Harlem on parole. The event took place at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, the oldest black Episcopal parish in New York City. The Rev. Patrick Williams of St. Philips welcomed an audience of more than 400 people.Each year, hundreds of previously incarcerated men and women return home to Harlem, one of the country’s poorest neighborhoods. Here they are faced with a number of challenges, including high unemployment and unstable housing. By fostering a more supportive environment upon re-entry into Harlem, Circles of Support aims to break the cycle of crime and incarceration within the community.In his keynote address, Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, suggested ways in which communities of faith can address mass incarceration and its negative consequences, emphasizing the need to remain hopeful about enacting change.“Injustice prevails where hopelessness persists,” he said. “I have never seen injustice overcome by only doing what is convenient.”As the master of ceremonies, actor and poet Craig “muMs” Grant stressed the need for criminal justice reform.“People often look at crime as an individual choice, but we need to change that narrative,” he said. “The U.S. incarcerates people at higher rates than any other country in the world. This system focuses on punishment and incapacitation as opposed to rehabilitation and restorative justice.”Harlem is a community of faith, with over 400 houses of worship. Episcopal churches in Manhattan, such as St. Philips, St. Mary’s, St. Ambrose, and All Souls, are places of welcome for people returning home from prison. They contribute to a number of important supportive services, including the provision of job and skills training, childcare, and counseling.“This evening we have been able to listen and learn from the families most involved in our criminal justice system, and we are committed to continuing our support for the work here in Harlem,” said Chris Flowers, chairman and chief executive officer of the J.C. Flowers Foundation.Monday night’s event included a panel of community members who discussed a range of issues affecting the community, for example, the impact of incarceration on families, and the ways in which limited access to jobs and quality education contribute to crime. Panelists also touched upon the harm of sentencing children to adult prisons.Members of the audience were able to participate in the Raise the Age letter-writing campaign by signing and sending letters to the New York state legislature, urging them to raise the age of criminal responsibility. Currently, New York is one of only two states in the country where the automatic age of criminal responsibility is still 16 – a policy resulting in harsh sentencing for children.“Tonight’s event is just the start of an important conversation,” said Thomas Edwards, community engagement specialist with Circles of Support. “The speakers and panelists drew much-needed attention to issues disproportionately affecting our community, such as mass incarceration and re-entry. This type of community engagement is critical to building a stronger community and stronger families.”The event was sponsored by a diverse group of partners, including JC Flowers Foundation, Church of the Heavenly Rest, the Interfaith Center of New York, the Harlem Community Justice Center, and Network in the Community. Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Harlem church draws attention to critical community issues Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Doug Desper says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ June 1, 2016 at 10:40 am Having worked in Juvenile Justice for years I hope that the more basic issues of parental responsibility, family planning, and a value on education/social skills will get increased attention. Out of wedlock children, poor family cohesion (with multiple fathers) and an intergenerational belief of being owed entitlements create a culture of disregard and dependence. These realities need to be challenged by the community expressing it’s expectations of individual responsibility. Comments are closed. F William Thewalt says: Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (3) May 26, 2016 at 10:04 am This event was so awesome. I feel that God put me in the right place just thought of what mr Stevenson and the other speakers spoke about there life around crimnal justice. My name is Cramon Milline,and I was in and out of training school for boys when I was young. Then at the age of 21, I was doing things to go to jail. I now work with men and women return back home to there community. That is why there speech was so inportant to me. Thank you. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group May 29, 2016 at 9:03 pm I wonder if I will ever see a story/article about how white folks somehow stay out of jail and if they do, encounter the same problems of being shunned or forgotten by society. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more